Zephyr Net


Return to the Fighters Anthology Resource Center

Go to the VNFAWING.com Forums
It is currently Mon Sep 26, 2022 08:38 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2019 23:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 09:25 am
Posts: 516
License production contracts with Russia and technical assistance deals may be strengthening North Korea’s air force.

North Korea’s armed forces learned during the Korean War the potentially devastating consequences of losing air superiority in a conflict with the United States, and air defense has ever since been a key priority in the country’s military doctrine. The Soviet Union emerged as a key supplier of arms for this purpose, expanding the small Korean War-era fighter fleet throughout the 1950s and granting generous military aid alongside reconstruction assistance. North Korea was the only foreign client for the Soviet S-25 surface-to-air missile system, a high-end platform tasked with the defense of Moscow itself, and Pyongyang would continue to upgrade its air defense network and fighter fleet throughout the Cold War.

With the collapse of the USSR in 1991, it was widely believed that North Korea would be unable to acquire modern military hardware for high end aerial warfare, or even parts to maintain and modernize existing systems, giving the United States and its allies an overwhelming advantage in the case of a future war on the Korean Peninsula. However, an analysis of the developments in the North Korean defense sector since the late 1980s and the potential for continued Russian assistance to its East Asian neighbor, help explain why the country’s ability to wage a war in the skies has remained strong despite all expectations.

In the wake of North Korean leader Kim Il Sung’s visit to the Soviet Union in October 1986, Moscow agreed to supply the country with its first MiG-29 Fulcrum fighter jets — an elite combat platform that had entered service in the Soviet Air Force only the previous year. With the heavier Su-27 Flanker struggling in its early days and being produced in very limited numbers, the MiG-29 was the most capable fully operational fighter in the USSR at the time. Pyongyang had gone to great lengths to strengthen its defense partnership with the neighboring superpower since 1984. Alongside a boom in trade and considerable Soviet investments in high-end industries in the aftermath of the leader’s visit, the USSR also helped to modernize North Korean aerial warfare capabilities. This included the provision of MiG-23 fighters, Su-25 attack jets, a Tin Shield early warning radar system, and S-200 air defense batteries, among other advanced armaments.

While North Korea is thought to have received approximately two dozen MiG-29 jets from the USSR, the country’s Air Force would go on to enlarge its fleet considerably by acquiring a permit and technological assistance from the Soviet Union to manufacture the elite fourth generation jets under license. The permit was given in 1987, and North Korea opened a small production line and manufactured two to three fighters per year. The Fulcrums were manufactured in Kwagsan and Taechun in North Pyongan province in the country’s northwest. By the end of the 1990s 15 fighters had reportedly been manufactured — a modest number compared to the Soviet production lines, which produced dozens of aircraft per year, but nevertheless a considerable addition to the North Korean fleet.

The first of the North Korean-built MiG-29 jets flew on April 15, 1993, and the performance was comparable to those built by the Soviet Union and Russia themselves — more sophisticated than the export variants marketed to clients such as Iraq and Iran. Nevertheless, a number of key components were required from Russia to maintain production. In 1997, North Korea signed a contract with Russian state-run arms dealer Rosvooruzhenye for military cooperation, which included continuing assistance for the manufacture of MiG-29 jets in North Korea. While the country’s Fulcrum fleet is estimated to have numbered around 35 jets at the time, extending indigenous production would see it grow considerably larger.

Russia today continues to maintain close defense ties to North Korea particularly in the field of air defense, having signed a number of military agreements including an agreement in 2015, declared their “Year of Friendship,” specifically facilitating close cooperation in air defense and intelligence. Visits to Moscow by high ranking delegations from the North Korean Air Force remain frequent, and according to U.S. sources Russia has continued to supply its East Asian neighbor with components key to maintaining its fighter fleet. It has repeatedly been pointed out that if the 2006 UN arms embargo against North Korea had been fully enforced, the majority of the North Korean fleet would today be unflyable – indicting that acquisitions of Russian parts has continued. A number of analysts have also speculated that Russia played a role in aiding North Korean in developing its KN-06 long range surface-to-air missile system, which entered mass production in 2017 as an analogue to the S-300 and may well use a number of Russian-made components.

A capable North Korean air defense network remains strongly in Russia’s interests to protect the country’s vulnerable Far East in the event of war with the United States, as well as to deter military action on the Korean Peninsula by Washington. With North Korea retaining the facilities needed to produce MiG-29 fighters of its own with a few minor inputs of Russian components, it remains likely that Moscow has continued to supply these inputs to keep production lines active. Without providing the country with a new class of fighter entirely, Russia can quietly assist its neighbor to expand its Fulcrum fleet and thus strengthen its aerial warfare capabilities. With no one entirely sure how many Fulcrums the North Korean Air Force actually fields, and many of the country’s airbases located underground, it is extremely difficult to prove any violations on Moscow’s part. Key components crossing the border are far easier to disguise than fighter airframes, and can therefore continue to be supplied inconspicuously without providing evidence to the United States to substantiate its accusations that Russia has violated the U.S. drafted UN sanctions regime against North Korea.

With Russia having reportedly already provided North Korea with advanced variants of the R-77 and R-27 long range air-to-air missiles, it is also a significant possibility that Moscow has also lent assistance in modernizing the MiG-29 jets in production by providing more advanced components for sensors and avionics. With North Korea having indicating its willingness to acquire cutting edge Su-35 air superiority fighters, an acquisition which would have cost approximately $1 billion for even a small contingent of just a dozen fighters, Pyongyang is well within its budgetary limits to afford modernization and a continuous manufacture of the MiG-29 — a lighter aircraft that comes at a fraction of the cost of the heavier Su-35. The fact that the country’s armed forces had some hope for a potential acquisition of the Su-35, Russia’s most capable fighter, indicates that a basis of high-level cooperation already exists in the field of aerial warfare.

The continued growth and modernization of the North Korean MiG-29 fleet remains a potent and cost-effective means of keeping the country’s air force viable against the threats posed by its leading potential adversaries. Continued cooperation to facilitate such growth is likely to continue be perceived by both Pyongyang and Moscow as strongly in their interests.

Abraham Ait is a military analyst and expert on Asia-Pacific security. He is the founder of Military Watch Magazine (https://militarywatchmagazine.com/).

From : https://thediplomat.com/2018/11/is-north-koreas-mig-29-fleet-growing/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 06:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 18:54 pm
Posts: 4364
Sorry Dimwit but this story was already proven false a while ago. Quit posting this out of date trash by this idiot.

You just won a second set of headupyourass awards...

Image

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer
VNFAWING.com Forum Administrator

VNFAWING Forums
VNFAWING Website

FA Futures/FA-2 is Still Being Worked On and Will Be Released...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 10:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 23, 2004 18:24 pm
Posts: 536
Location: Indiana
The best way to defeat North Korea is to drop in firearms and ammunition for its citizens, along with propaganda telling the story of how the US defeated British rule in the late 18th century.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 03:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 18:54 pm
Posts: 4364
usnraptor wrote:
The best way to defeat North Korea is to drop in firearms and ammunition for its citizens, along with propaganda telling the story of how the US defeated British rule in the late 18th century.


You would have to drop in tons upon tons of food for them to have the ability to fight back as they are kept near starving to make it easier to control them. Plus they are so indoctrinated the average citizen would never take the chance to pickup a rifle.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer
VNFAWING.com Forum Administrator

VNFAWING Forums
VNFAWING Website

FA Futures/FA-2 is Still Being Worked On and Will Be Released...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 23, 2004 18:24 pm
Posts: 536
Location: Indiana
CAG Hotshot wrote:
usnraptor wrote:
The best way to defeat North Korea is to drop in firearms and ammunition for its citizens, along with propaganda telling the story of how the US defeated British rule in the late 18th century.


You would have to drop in tons upon tons of food for them to have the ability to fight back as they are kept near starving to make it easier to control them. Plus they are so indoctrinated the average citizen would never take the chance to pickup a rifle.


Great; this will help us with the stray pet population.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 11:53 am 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2003 19:11 pm
Posts: 2117
usnraptor wrote:
CAG Hotshot wrote:
usnraptor wrote:
The best way to defeat North Korea is to drop in firearms and ammunition for its citizens, along with propaganda telling the story of how the US defeated British rule in the late 18th century.


You would have to drop in tons upon tons of food for them to have the ability to fight back as they are kept near starving to make it easier to control them. Plus they are so indoctrinated the average citizen would never take the chance to pickup a rifle.


Great; this will help us with the stray pet population.


North Korea's such a great and friendly nation and such a superstar that they let those stray pets execute traitors. Of course being eaten alive by dogs is a privilege to serve the great Kim Dynasty. Even better, they had an audience and sure they had rifle butts in their backs so that they wouldn't turn away but such is the sacrifice to live in such a utopia.

_________________
Centurian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2019 06:04 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 18:54 pm
Posts: 4364
They definitely have no money for more MiG-29s... Which is why they are still flying MiG-15UTI, MiG-17s, MiG-19s, MiG-21s (plus all chinese derivatives) and MiG-23s... and a few Su-25s. I think their Su-7s have finally bit the dust.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer
VNFAWING.com Forum Administrator

VNFAWING Forums
VNFAWING Website

FA Futures/FA-2 is Still Being Worked On and Will Be Released...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2021 19:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 21:33 pm
Posts: 377
Location: Oklahoma, USA
Maybe they will sell the NK's some junk MIG-29's.
Years ago, they sold Algeria a bunch of well-worn 29's.

Maybe they can cannibalize them to build some flyable ones. :lol:
Good luck and count your fingers, Kim! :lol:

Best Regards,
Pappy

_________________
Tally Ho Pappy's In!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2021 21:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 18:54 pm
Posts: 4364
I cant believe the NKs are still flying IL-28s with antiship missiles. It is amazing they can keep all these old birds in the air. Shows that someone in that God Forsaken Hell Hole has true talent...

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer
VNFAWING.com Forum Administrator

VNFAWING Forums
VNFAWING Website

FA Futures/FA-2 is Still Being Worked On and Will Be Released...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2021 08:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 21:33 pm
Posts: 377
Location: Oklahoma, USA
We have done a great job keeping our B-52 fleet in the air. :wink:
Getting parts out of the airplane grave yard in Arizona.
Flying the planes with 1950's tube technology.

Best Regards,
Pappy

_________________
Tally Ho Pappy's In!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2021 18:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 18:54 pm
Posts: 4364
Not much 50s tech left in the B-52s... They have been going thru a major upgraded and now use our targetting pods and flat screen displays in the cockpit... But what they really need is an engine replacement but its doubtful they will actually get it.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer
VNFAWING.com Forum Administrator

VNFAWING Forums
VNFAWING Website

FA Futures/FA-2 is Still Being Worked On and Will Be Released...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2021 18:54 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2003 19:11 pm
Posts: 2117
CAG Hotshot wrote:
Not much 50s tech left in the B-52s... They have been going thru a major upgraded and now use our targetting pods and flat screen displays in the cockpit... But what they really need is an engine replacement but its doubtful they will actually get it.


They really do but they're getting Rolls-Royce F130s.
USAF selected it back in September.
Hopefully no one cuts the funding for it for something stupid.

_________________
Centurian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2021 21:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2003 18:54 pm
Posts: 4364
I Don't expect the re-engine to go thru without cuts... They would rather waste the money on idiotic things instead in our current worthless govt.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer
VNFAWING.com Forum Administrator

VNFAWING Forums
VNFAWING Website

FA Futures/FA-2 is Still Being Worked On and Will Be Released...


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group